Nutrition Tips

How To Love Oatmeal | My Favorite Recipe

There are two types of people in this world.

  • People who hate everything there is about oatmeal.
  • People who love oatmeal more than anything in this world.

I fall in the fine line between the two. I don’t hate oatmeal but I don’t exactly melt in joy at the very idea of eating it. I’ve tried it many different ways, my main problem with it the texture. It’s just everything I hate in food. Now I’m also not deluded against the properties of oatmeal in my diet so hence I continued trying the porridge in different ways. Before I continue here is the health benefits of oatmeal. This way you can understand the driving force in my many attempts to love oatmeal.

Health Benefits of Oatmeal:

1* Oatmeal contains soluble fiber which stays in the stomach longer and helps you feel fuller, longer. This can prevent overeating later on in the day, which may help you maintain a healthy weight and avoid the health problems associated with overweight. Eating just a half cup of oatmeal a day is enough to reap the many health benefits of the fiber it contains. Fiber describes the portion of plant materials in the diet which humans cannot digest. It is an important component in maintaining gastrointestinal (GI) health by regulating transit time through the GI tract and adding bulk, increasing a feeling of fullness and preventing constipation. One cup of oatmeal contains about 150 calories, 4 grams of fiber (about half soluble and half insoluble), and 6 grams of protein. In addition to fiber, oatmeal is rich in thiamin, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, manganese, selenium, and iron.*

Oatmeal can truly do wonders in your diet especially when your active. Now if you hate oatmeal cooked in a microwave or oven than my way will definitely be something. I like overnight oats. I love smoothies. One day I made way to much smoothie for lunch and was a bit unsure to do with the leftovers. That is until the light bulb when off. Why don’t I just replace the liquid element of the overnight oats with my smoothie? Pure brilliance I tell you. I’m not even kidding, it’s gold. It’s super easy.

Here is my Recipe to Success:

IMG_2902

½ cup of oatmeal (125ml)

1 – 1 ½ cup of smoothie (250ml – 375ml)

You can add fresh fruit if desired. Make sure to stir the heaven in a bottle correctly before storing it away in the fridge for 4-6 hours. You can get away with 2 hours in the fridge but the longer the oatmeal sits in the liquid the nicer it’s going to be. The liquid needs to be double the amount of the oatmeal. The more liquid you add the easier it would be to drink. So 1 cup will make the overnight oats thick and you would have to eat it with a spoon. 1 ½ cup will make the oatmeal drinkable.

It’s delicious. I really recommend you to give it a try. It will change your world. Obviously you will only love this if you love smoothies and you tolerate overnight oats.

I hope you will learn to love Oatmeal as I did,

if not there is always Muesli!

Source(s):

1* https://www.healthyeating.org/Healthy-Eating/All-Star-Foods/Grains/Article-Viewer/Article/208/health-benefits-of-oatmeal

 

Nutrition Tips

How To Go Gluten Free

The first subject I want to preach about in my nutrition tips section is something I’m very well rehearsed in. If the title wasn’t a dead ringer about the topic the next sentence will be a dead giveaway. So you want to go gluten free? I’m going to start of by getting technical and explaining a few things. Naturally with a help of a few well sourced websites.

*1 Gluten is a general name for the proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and triticale – a cross between wheat and rye. Gluten helps foods maintain their shape, acting as a glue that holds food together. Gluten can be found in many types of foods, even ones that would not be expected.*

There is three different reasons why someone would go gluten free: First number up is an immune disease called celiac. *2 Celiac disease is a serious autoimmune disorder that can occur in genetically predisposed people where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. It is estimated to affect 1 in 100 people worldwide. When people with celiac disease eat gluten, their body mounts an immune response that attacks the small intestine. These attacks lead to damage on the villi, small fingerlike projections that line the small intestine, that promote nutrient absorption. When the villi get damaged, nutrients cannot be absorbed properly into the body. Celiac disease is hereditary, meaning that it runs in families.*

Secondly there is gluten intolerance or non-celiac wheat sensitivity. *3 People with non-celiac wheat sensitivity experience symptoms similar to those of celiac disease, which resolve when gluten is removed from the diet. However, they do not test positive for celiac disease.* So basically these individuals get a long list of unpleasant symptoms because of gluten in their diet and once they make the change they are as good as new.

And then the last runner up is just the simple gluten free diet. Recently more individuals  than ever identify themselves as gluten intolerant or celiac. This created quite a hype over a gluten free diet and what benefits it can hold for losing weight. It has caused the gluten protein to get quite a bad reputation and although I personally don’t care for the protein, if your body can digest and get the benefits from it than why cut it? Although I do recommend you read your label to see what else might be in your beloved pasta or bread.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way I can give you a few tips on how to go gluten free. You need to know that it’s pricey most of the time. So it will be near impossible to throw out all the products in your kitchen that might contain gluten and replace them with a gluten free options. I did this gradually, by starting with an almost complete gluten free diet with small amounts of gluten till I got the hang of it. You also need to know that gluten is in almost everything, products you won’t even think of. Always and I mean always read that label. You will become a professional at spotting the word gluten that I can promise you. The last tip I can give you is mostly for mental support. It’s very difficult to go gluten free especially if the choice is forced by a test result, so surround yourself with people in a similar situation. You’re going to need someone to complain and relate to when being gluten free is being a pain in your arse.

Best of luck!

I will post a blog about how I found out about my gluten sensitivity in the next few weeks. If you have any questions or just need a friend, you know where to find me.

Source(s):

(1) Read more at https://celiac.org/live-gluten-free/glutenfreediet/what-is-gluten/#TdMYcXbyZTmZ72Jr.99

(2) Read more at https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/what-is-celiac-disease/#eXKXRYwI2Ew5CJ2h.99

(3) Read more at https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-2/#ZDF4lwIS1esROTQ4.99