Celiac Disease, General Life Tips, Nutrition Tips

Traveling With Celiac Disease | How To Stay Gluten Free On Your Travels

So the one thing I hate about traveling is trying to figure out how I’m going to eat without getting sick. It’s not always easy and the fact that I can’t go out and try all the native meals which really sucks but there is no use crying over spilt milk. You just have to clean it and go on with your day. That’s all I can really say. Sometimes it can really suck to have celiac disease. Now I don’t travel a lot and when I do travel I have to think about quite a few things before I do so like what am I going to eat and how am I going to eat? Pretty standard if you ask me. Here is my tips on the matter.

  1. A Place With A Kitchen

First things first you need to stay at a place where you have access to a kitchen to cook your own meals. I know that doesn’t scream oh I’m on holiday but it’s better than being in so much pain and unable to enjoy your holiday because you got gluten in your system. I learned this one the hard way.

  1. Bring The Basics With

This one is pretty hand in hand with number one but I felt like I should milk this at least have enough to write for five tips. It’s super important to bring the basics with you on your trip. Shelf foods if you catch my drift. Pastas, rice, bread, sauce and etc. It’s no guarantee that the closest supermarket will have any gluten free foods so it’s better to be prepared. Here is an example of what I packed in when we went to Greece. I packed in enough food for the two of us as most holiday places to stay at kitchen is pretty basic so there isn’t an option of cooking pasta’s separate and etc. So it looked like a lot but it did come in handy and whatever is left you can always bring back home.

Sorry that this picture is so shit in quality. I had to screenshot from my Instagram. The original picture is long deleted.

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  1. Do your research

Doing your research before going on your trip can really save the day. See what restaurants you can find close to your hotel and how many of them have gluten free options. Now don’t expect a long list heck you will feel lucky to find one but you can contact them before going on the trip and ask if they can help you. There is still foods that’s naturally gluten free and if prepared right then you have no problems. I can’t promise that there will be something for you but it’s worth to look into. Unfortunately it’s just one of those things.

  1. Accept your fate

This sounds pretty horrible and even if you really try there is still a chance that you will get glutened. The best way to avoid it is to cook all of your meals and bring enough basics with so you only have to rely on vegetables and meat. But it can still slip through so be prepared for that. Take what normally helps ease the pain, I have a hot water sack that I hold against my belly when the stomach pain is really bad. It’s the only thing I have to ease the pain but maybe you have other things that helps you.

  1. Another tip that I can’t think off

Damn I really want five tips but I honestly can’t think of another tip sooooo let’s just act like I have another tip to share. Wait I have a tip! Just try to enjoy your trip and don’t be too hard on yourself. Although you didn’t need me to tell you that.

I hope this was helpful to someone. Thank you so much for reading and I will see you in a click!

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Celiac Disease, Nutrition Tips

What Happens To Me When I Get ‘Glutened’ | Celiac Disease

There is quite a large difference between my body’s reaction with a small scale gluten and a large scale gluten. Both events are equally uncomfortable and something I wouldn’t like to repeat.

Small Scale

What I mean by a small scale reaction is just what it sounds. I got a small amount of gluten in my system as in traces of another product –we didn’t wash the pan correctly or I used Onno’s spoon by mistake. It could also come from a product made in a factory where they handle gluten. It’s small amounts. Heck it could even be from we used a pinch of spices that contains gluten or I prepared food on a dirty platform so some bread crumbs was on the table and it got on my food. It really could be the smallest thing and it would be enough. Here is two examples.

I went to a football (soccer) game with Onno and his family and bought a glass of water. No food and water is allowed to enter the arena so you buy what’s available. As you can guess the first thirty minutes after the gates open and before the game begins all of the service counters are beyond the point of busy. They pump out drinks and foods left and right. The main drink being served is a beer. They pour the drink in a clear plastic cup. All the drinks all served in the small cup. I always get water that they pour from a water bottle into the same clear plastic cup. I got gluten in my system and started to feel the effects just as we pulled out of the parking lot. There was some beer in my glass. I didn’t taste it but that’s the only thing that makes sense. The second time we went I asked to buy a bottle as I don’t really want to go two hours without a drink but they refuse to sell it. So I have yet to figure out just how I can enjoy a game with something to drink without getting sick. Another example is the popcorn at the movies. It was something I had to confirm as normal popcorn we buy from the shop never gives us a problem but alas the spice mixture they use at the movies contains gluten.

So now that you get a clear idea just how small the gluten could be to make me sick, I can tell you just how sick I get.

  • Stomach pain
  • Heavy stomach bloating
  • Nauseous
  • Exhaustion
  • Dizziness
  • Foggy Brain

The recovery from a small scale attack take two to three days. The stomach bloating which is so large and uncomfortable won’t go away for about four days. I will have some stomach cramps but it’s bearable (sometimes). Sometimes I will have blood in my next number two bathroom trip.

Big Scale

I haven’t had a big scale attack in a year if not more. The amount of gluten needs to be an actual normal product as in a donut, muffin, pasta, pizza literally anything that’s the usual thing you can get. Big scale attacks are extreme and so painful. I can barely put it into words.

  • Extreme stomach pain and cramps
  • Extreme stomach bloating (nine months pregnant type of stomach in minutes)
  • Extreme nauseous
  • Extreme exhaustion
  • Extreme dizziness
  • Extreme foggy brain

The recovery time from a big scale attack can take weeks. The attack is anything but bearable. I ball into myself and sob from the pain. For the next few days, all of my number two’s have blood in it. I also lose all of my appetite. It is anything but pleasant.

The point of this blog is really just to show that although some people follow a gluten free diet because they feel it would benefit them in weight loss other are physically allergic to the protein. If someone orders a gluten free meal don’t give them an attitude about it. Be respectful because honey if you gluten me for shit and giggles (it has happened before) I will punch you in the gut so at least you can feel half of the pain I do. Okay wow that is aggressive but it really does anger me. How hard is it to respect others? I’m going to end this blog here as I’m really not sure where this is going.

I wish you all the best and I will see you in a click!

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